Having Psoriasis is Not The End


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Our Secretary to Association, Sofia Lovi Ramasamy sharing her experience to encourage more psoriasis patients to come forward and join our community. You are not alone, we are here for each other. Together we can create more awareness and drive for change in public perception towards our condition. Here is Sofia’s experience.

“I was diagnosed with psoriasis at the age of 12. Being so young, I didn’t understand what it was. It started with extensive dandruff on my scalp. Then I started getting patches on my face and both my upper and lower limbs. It became worse as I got older. I was like a snake going through the shedding process.”

“At one point the lesions covered 70% of my body. Because my immune system was so weak, I started losing my hair. I lost about 10 kgs. I lost mobility. That’s when the arthritis started. It started with my toes. Then my neck started to fuse. My fingers and shoulders were affected as well.”

“In 2014, I was bed ridden for a year. I couldn’t move. I couldn’t feed or bathe myself. I had to rely a lot on my family and it made me feel like I was a burden to them. I couldn’t even contribute to society or to myself. I didn’t see the point of living. That was a really difficult time for me. There were a lot of demons in my head. I had a lot of suicidal thoughts.”

“What pulled me out of the darkness is talking to other patients in the hospital. I spoke to a lot of people. Some of them had terminal illness and only had a few more months to live. I tried to understand what they were going through. It made me feel like my situation wasn’t that bad. It gave me the strength to get well. It gave me a better understanding of my purpose in life.”

“I always involve myself in community building and other social activities. Being able to contribute and be of service is the centre of my life. I want to help create awareness about psoriasis so the public will be less ignorant about the condition. I want to be the voice for other patients who are basically voiceless.”

This article first appeared in True Complexion.

 

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